So I Finished My First Triathlon – Now What?

So I Finished My First Triathlon – Now What?

By Morgan Johnson

It’s official – you’ve crossed the finish line, become a “real” triathlete and you are now (officially) obsessed. So what comes next? I have had literally dozens of athletes walk into our training facility and tell me, “I just finished my first sprint triathlon and it was so awesome I signed up to do an Ironman this summer!” While the spirit is great, one of the things I am always looking for as a coach is how I can help the athlete have a positive, healthy, long-term experience with the sport. This might mean a long-course competition, or it might be something else, so take a deep breath and let’s talk about what this looks like for you.

Finished a triathlon now what - Morgan Johnson

First, let’s talk equipment. There are some basics I recommend for every new triathlete – first, a road bike, either aluminum or carbon fiber in good working condition that fits correctly is, in my opinion, essential for a beginner. Road bikes are generally faster and more efficient, creating a more enjoyable workout experience for you, the athlete, without the more aggressive geometry of a time trial or “tri” bike, which can be uncomfortable for newer athletes who have not had the opportunity to build the strength and flexibility a time trial bike demands. Your bike should be accompanied by clipless bike shoes and pedals – avoid hand-me-downs if possible, and make sure the shoes are a proper fit – and, of course, a comfortable road bike helmet (ventilation is a must!) with no cracks or crashes to its name.

Second, when it comes to the swim, get a “real” training suit (tight with no extra material), and a good pair of goggles that won’t leak and create frustration or interrupted laps. I also have my athletes purchase a swim snorkel (front-loaded) for kicking and drills in the pool – in my opinion, if you only own one swim aid, this is the one to have.

Third, make sure you get a pair of running shoes that are right for your run form and body type – I recommend visiting a running store where the employees can evaluate your stride and recommend a comparable shoe.

The most important piece of equipment? A heart rate monitor, accompanied with heart rate zones (many field tests exist to determine these, and some USA Triathlon performance centers, such as Playtri, offer the option of blood lactate testing for an even more accurate determination of zones). Knowing your body’s limits and abilities will make your training healthier and more effective.

Once you’ve got the gear, it’s time to talk training. First of all, having a plan, any plan is always better than having no plan at all. If actual coaching is in the budget, this is always the first choice (USA Triathlon offers a list of certified coaches all over the country on the website), but if not, a group training program or online training plan or program is definitely a good place to start. The less interaction you have with an actual coach, the more conservative your plan should be. While online plans can be great, they do not necessarily adjust for injuries, sick days, family emergencies and other obstacles and interruptions. Always err on the side of caution when making choices regarding training to avoid injury and over-training or under-recovering – you’ll never be the fastest if you don’t make it to the start line. Want to take some risks? Invest in an actual coach.

The number one aspect of training most age-group athletes ignore? Recovery. Training hard is only great when it is paired with proper recovery. Never forget that fitness occurs during recovery.

So what about that Ironman? Again, you need a plan based on your athletic foundation and personal strengths and weaknesses. Some triathletes might be ready to tackle this goal their first year in the sport, but generally speaking a more moderate progression is recommended to build a solid foundation for the endeavor. Get some more sprint triathlons in that first year, then next year focus on the Olympic-distance, then maybe a half Iron distance the next year, and so on. A coach will also be handy here for evaluating your current fitness level in the context of their knowledge and experience of the sport.

Always remember that the goal is not just to complete the race, but to finish healthy and wanting more.

Best of luck in your new favorite sport! You have a huge, friendly community of fellow athletes and coaches ready and willing to help you have the best possible experience, so never be afraid to ask questions and ask for help.

Morgan Johnson is a USA Triathlon Level I and Youth and Juniors certified coach and a USA Cycling Level III coach. She coaches Team Playtri Elite, a USA Triathlon High Performance Team, at the Playtri Performance Center in Dallas, Texas. For more information, visit her bio at www.playtri.com/morgan.

Hydration and Electrolyte Replacement: Why and How?

hydration and electrolyte replacement - triathlonsThere is already some great advice about hydration here on the RaceTri site, but I wanted to give a little more information for those who are looking for an advantage as they move forward with their training and competition goals.

 When we talk about hydration we should really divide it into two categories.  First, is simply good old H20.  You need water to function.  Failure to consume enough water can elevate blood pressure, contribute to increased risk of heat illness (including both heat exhaustion and heat stroke), and decrease muscle function.  If you break down the biochemistry you’ll see that water is a key component to basically every process in your body.  So make sure you drink enough water.  A good rule of thumb is one half cup per 20 minutes of exercise.

The second category of hydration is electrolyte replacement.  For this I recommend becoming aware of what I call the Big 3: sodium, potassium, and calcium.  These three are heavily involved in the normal function of muscles and nerves in the body.  This includes skeletal muscle as well as heart muscle.  Unfortunately, normal electrolyte levels can require a delicate balance to function well.  In all three cases the electrolyte in question can have negative effects when the levels are too high or too low.

For sodium, not getting enough is not usually the problem.  Even if you consciously eat a low sodium diet you probably still get plenty of it.  However, there is a condition called hyponatremia that most commonly affects endurance athletes.  Despite having adequate sodium in the diet, consuming large quantities of water without any electrolytes can dilute the concentration of sodium in the blood.  This is a serious medical emergency and the consequences may be severe.  The purpose here is not to scare you, but to make you more aware of the need to replace those electrolytes as you go.  This is why I recommend using a sports drink (or sports gel and water) containing electrolytes while you are doing any vigorous endurance exercise, especially if the conditions are hot and humid.

Potassium is almost an opposite of sodium.  Where most diets have more than adequate sodium, they often lack potassium.  There are two ways to combat this.  You can take a supplement or you can improve your diet.  The concern with taking a supplement is that it may not be absorbed as well and it may be too much.  Unlike sodium where too little is dangerous, having too much potassium can lead to a condition called hyperkalemia, which can also have severe consequences.  So I recommend getting your potassium from food sources.  Many people think of bananas as a great source for potassium, but better still are sweet potatoes and dark, leafy greens.  Here’s a link to other great food sources of potassium http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixb.htm.

Calcium is probably the least severe of the group since the body is very effective at regulating the concentration in the blood.  However, one of the ways this is done is by pulling calcium from bones when it becomes scarce.  This is one of the reasons female endurance athletes are more susceptible to conditions such as osteoporosis.  Dairy remains one the best sources for calcium, but can be accompanied by less healthy nutrients, especially if you think ice cream is the best way to get calcium.  In addition, many people choose to eliminate dairy due to personal choice or food allergies.  You can eat foods fortified with calcium (soy milk, some juices) or spinach and some other leafy greens.  The above link has tables for both typical dairy sources of calcium as well as non-dairy sources.

So what’s the bottom line for all this?  First, when hydrating during long exercise bouts, choose a sport drink (or gel and water) that contains sodium and potassium to reduce the risk of severe side effects.  Second, get enough calcium as part of your daily diet to prevent bone loss.  If you eat right and keep exercising you’ve put yourself in the best possible position to have a long healthy life.

Dr. EagarDr. Eagar is a dual credentialed provider with degrees in sports medicine, chiropractic medicine, and exercise science.  Dr. Eagar owns Active Advantage, a private sports medicine practice with an emphasis on rehabilitation and chronic injury management.  He enjoys answering questions and can be reached at activeadvantagechiro@gmail.com.  For more general information you can visit his website http://www.activeadvantagechiro.com.

 

Preparing and Training for Your First Triathlon

Preparing and training for your first triathlonPreparing and training for your first triathlon

You can do it! Let that be my first bit of advice when preparing and training for your first triathlon.  All you’ve got to do is cross the finish line and you will be awarded the title of triathlete.  For most of us the reasons for signing up for a triathlon are peer pressure, looking for another challenge, or a combination of both.  That is exactly what you need to have in preparing for your first triathlon, support and the excitement of challenging yourself.  I have been inspired by so many who have been doing triathlons for years but never really considered myself a candidate because I am a terrible runner.  Everyone comes into the sport with a weak spot.  I suspect that for most it’s swimming, that’s very understandable since most of us haven’t spent time in the pool outside of the irregular hotel stay or pool party during the summer months.  Overcoming your weakness isn’t an overnight deal.  It takes serious commitment, but you can do it.  One of my favorite books that I’ve never read, but am completely in love with is “Slow, Fat, Triathlete.”   Yep, I’ve never read it, but I love the sentiment.  You don’t have to be quick, slim, and super fit to be a triathlete, you just have to participate and finish.  OK, so here’s how I would approach preparing and training for your first triathlon.

Determine Your Goals

Determine how long your first triathlon will be. Starting your training for your first triathlon will all depend upon what your current aerobic levels are and what your goals are. What distance do you want to do? 1/2 sprint, sprint or olympic? A sprint length – 15miles total is a great first choice. Training will allow you to build up endurance, shed some extra pounds, improve your health immensely AND will not take a lot of time out of your busy schedule. If you are starting from scratch, I would recommend triathlons with total mileage between 15 to 20 miles. This will allow you to ‘test’ yourself. You will be able to get familiar with your technique in the two transition areas – T1 and T2, it will allow you to test your equipment PLUS you will have a good time since you will not be concerned with placing your first time.

I will focus on getting you through your first sprint program – 15 miles.

Building A Base (2-6 Months)

Very important first step. We can not just go out and run 5 miles or swim a 1/2 mile to start with? Our joints will fall apart! We need to get our joints used to these new stresses that we will be putting on them. Joints take longer to build up than aerobic stamina. So we build a base. A simple walk/run routine is best. Overweight beginners may find that their knees hurt when starting a conservative running program. NOT TO WORRY! You may be better off starting with biking and shedding off some extra pounds before running. Brisk walking for a few weeks will really help your body transition to jogging and then to running. Your joints will thank you. Everyone has varying degrees of fitness, some are active, but just not used to doing the particular sport.  Listen to your body and be patient. You don’t need to be able to run 3 miles, bike 14, and swim 500-800 meters tomorrow.  Use each week to slowly advance and by race day you’ll be mentally and physically prepared.

Rule#1: The most important rule is to follow the 10% rule. Never go up in training distance or duration by more than 10% the following week. If you do, you will be sorry.

Rule#2: Always schedule a ‘rest’ week once a month. One of the most important aspects to training is REST! You can’t keep going up by 10% every week – you will burn out. You need a 30-50% decrease in duration/distance AND intensity for a whole week at least once a month. Not to worry, you will not lose your base but will come back stronger.

With these rules, you can easily come up with a routine in the run, bike, or swim.

When building a base, try to do your single event training 3-4 times/week.

If you are new to training, focus on just either the run or the bike for 2-6 months – yes months – to build up your aerobic base. You may find that starting all three sports at once will be too much. Once you have focused on one event for 2-6 months, then you may add the next/other one or two in with your training while ALWAYS following rules 1 and 2.

Swim, Bike and Run Training Plan

Once you have built a base, you can start training for all three sports. Typically for a sprint triathlon, you only need to train twice a week in each of the three sports. That is 6 days with one rest day. OR you can have one day where you do two events, say a swim then a run. Then four others days where you just do one training session per day. That will give you two days off per week (my favorite).

To make your training schedule, follow the Rules (1 and 2), and make a plan where you swim, bike and run two times/week.

For weak events, you may slip in a third day of training per week for that specific event to help.

Tips for running, if you are like me and running is not your fun sport, start by walking/jogging for one mile, do this every-other day for a week – possibly two.  Then advance to jogging the whole mile 3x a week.  After this point you can begin to increase your distance and you’ll find that your pace will naturally increase as your body becomes accustomed to the journey.

Tips for biking, similar to running start off with casual rides, short distances at a conversational pace, but frequently.  Everyday or if possible twice a day, this gets your bottom used to the saddle and your legs and knees ready to add some distance.  After a week or two, take a longer bike ride, 7 miles or so, and take a nice rest day afterward.  Make time for a long bike rides every week and increase your milage each time.  It won’t take very long before your doing 20 or 30 mile rides.  These make great Facebook posts.

Tips for swimming, do not be surprised that you find yourself unbelievably out of breath and out of your comfort zone your first couple times in the pool.  Swimming is not something our bodies do naturally, using arms instead of legs, being vertical instead of horizontal, and breathing out face down in the water and breathing in on your side. Give yourself a at least two weeks of swim time before making any rash decisions.  Most people believe they are bad swimmers, until they realize they just need a little coaching and some time in the water.  Ask for help while at the pool.  I am seriously grateful for an older gentalman 70+ who gave me some pointers and a lot of encouragement when I first got in the water.  Go easy and push yourself when you feel you are ready.  Watch youtube videos on swimming, practice your stroke outside of the pool, and do push-ups to increase arm strength. After you can swim one mile, its all downhill from there. If you can float on your back, you’ll never drown.

Here is an example:


Week

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

1

Swim-X

Run-20 min

Off Bike-X Run-20 min Swim-X Off Bike-X

2

Swim-X+10%

Run-22 min

Off Bike-X+10% Run-22 min Swim-X+10% Off Bike-X+10%

Pre-Race Training – Final 13 weeks

For the final 13 week leading up to your sprint triathlon, go to Sprint Program

I recommend only one book to start your training whatever your current level is. The book is Triathloning for Ordinary Mortals by Steven Jonas, M.D. This is the best book for starting from scratch. Steven Jonas does triathlons for fun, not professionally, so it is very easy to relate to.

Besides learning how to run or to train for a triathlon, I also have The Next Level (weight-lifting). From having the experience of doing both at the same time, I would encourage you to check out both sites. BUT if your just starting any exercise routine after a long hiatus then pick your favorite. Contrary to popular belief, you actually can lose weight on a lifting routine if you are serious and don’t go to the gym for social hour. This would consist of a routine with lots of reps – so as not to build a lot of muscle (lots of muscle is counter-productive for the serious triathlete) combined with a walk/jog routine (Starting from Scratch). This might be a smarter way to start-up than starting training for all three of the triathlon events at once.

Starting with a weight training program with the walk/jog routine will build up your bone density, strengthening your joints, getting your muscles awakened from their long sleep. It will take a couple of months for your metabolism to ‘reorganize’ itself. Your cells will take this period to reconfigure its bio-machinery: enzymatic pathways, energy systems, different metabolic pathways, etc…this is a big step to get used to – your body has probably been in hibernation for quite a while. During this period you will feel sore, maybe worn out at times…you will probably not want to go back to the gym most of the time BUT if you can hold out for 2-3 months you will start feeling better, a lot less sore and you will start having confidence – getting that mental edge. Once this happens, you will start gaining momentum in your workout and how you feel. This feeling will auto-accelerate so you will want to go to the gym now! If you don’t go then you will feel ‘drowsy’ from doing nothing since doing nothing is allowing your metabolism to slow.

In preparing and training for your first triathlon – always remember, you can do this!  Start of easy and slow, and keep at it.  Post your accomplishments on Facebook, this will give you the encouragement and maybe a training partner or two to help you along your journey to becoming a triathlete.

Your thoughts on training for your first triathlon:

  • Who inspired you to begin training for your first triathlon?
  • What steps would you suggest for something thinking about preparing and training for a triathlon
  • How do you train and prepare for a triathlon during the winter?

Training for a Half IronMan

Training for a Half Ironman Triathlon

By Ken Mierke and Joe Friel

This is a  repost from http://www.trifuel.com/training/triathlon-training/preparing-for-a-half-ironman-triathlon

The half ironman triathlon presents unique challenges. This distance is short enough that a well-conditioned athlete pushes throughout the race, but long enough to demand disciplined pacing and effective nutrition strategies. Preparing for a half ironman requires balancing long workouts, designed to improve endurance, with higher intensity workouts, designed to increase the pace that can be maintained for the race duration. Half ironman racing also requires plans for effective fueling, hydrating, and pacing.

Training

The two key workouts for a half ironman triathlon are both brick workouts (bike followed by run). The first is a long brick workout at an easy pace. The second is a race-pace brick workout.

A half ironman is a relatively long race. The endurance to hold up for race duration is always the triathlete’s most important ability. A brick workout at a basic endurance pace, gradually increasing in duration, is key for building that endurance.

Begin with a one-to two-hour ride followed by a 30-minute to one-hour run. Experienced athletes who have already developed a solid endurance base can start at the high end of the range. Gradually build the duration of these workouts until a three- to four-hour ride followed by a one- to two-hour run is comfortable. These workouts should be completed at a basic endurance pace (zone 2 in the Training Bible system of monitoring intensity). Both the ride and the run should take place on flat to gently rolling terrain so that intensity can be kept under control. This workout is the priority during the base period.

After establishing a solid endurance base, a race-pace brick becomes the priority workout. This workout increases cycling and speeds that can be maintained for the half ironman distances. During your build phase, perform one of these workouts each week.

Workout intensity is based on each athlete’s ability. Beginner triathletes should be more concerned about developing the endurance to finish a half ironman than about speed. On the other hand, intermediate and advanced triathletes are not worried about being able to finish, but are concerned with the pace that they can maintain for the duration.

Begin with a ride of about one hour at endurance pace (zone 2). After the hour is up, increase speed and attempt to maintain the intensity that can be sustained for the duration of the half ironman race. For beginning athletes, this will be at endurance pace or just slightly faster. For intermediates, this will be somewhat faster than endurance pace and will probably fall in the upper half of heart rate zone 3. Advanced athletes will maintain sub-threshold pace, approximately five to eight beats per minute below lactate threshold, in the lower half of heart rate zone 4. Increase this workout conservatively, monitoring recovery closely. It can bring quick improvements, but can also lead quickly to overtraining.

Do this workout on terrain similar to the race course. Keep intensity steady and maintain relatively high cadence. Eat and drink exactly according to your race plan. Maintain the intensity that you could realistically hold for race duration. Harder is not better.

Begin running as soon after the ride as possible. For the first segment of the run, hold the pace that feels sustainable for race distance. Continue to eat and drink as you will during the race. Finish the workout with at least 20 minutes of easy running.

Begin using 30- to 45-minute, race-pace segments on the bike and 20- to 30-minute, race-pace segments on the run. Increase duration of the race pace segments consistently, but gradually. These workouts develop efficiency at race intensity and allow practicing the skills of pacing, hydrating, and fueling.

Race-pace workouts should never approach race duration. Even advanced athletes should build up to no more than 50 percent of race duration at race pace. Full efforts should be saved for race day. The time required for recovery from huge efforts, such as 75 percent of half ironman distance at race pace, is not worth the benefit. Save those full efforts for race day and concentrate on consistent and efficient training until then.

Fueling and Hydrating

For an international-distance triathlon, most of the energy to be expended is already stored in the body at the start. While fueling and hydrating during those races can be important, they become even more important at the half-ironman distance, when much of the required fuel must be consumed during the race.

Fueling begins hours before the race, at breakfast. The goal is to provide the body with adequate fuel without overloading the digestive system. Practicing this before workouts is critical. We can provide guidelines, but every athlete is different and finding the unique combination of foods that work best for you is a trial and error process. Consume 400 to 800 calories about three hours before a half ironman. Try to consume one gram of protein for every three to four grams of carbohydrate.

Consuming water and carbohydrate immediately pre-race can benefit as well. Obviously fueling and hydrating during the swim are impractical, but food and water consumed directly before the swim start can be delivered to the working muscles during the swim. We recommend consuming 100 to 300 calories of carbohydrate and 8 to 12 ounces of water immediately before the start. Make sure to consume this last feeding as soon before the start as possible. This prevents an insulin response leaving blood sugar low at the race start.

On the course, hydration is a top priority. A 150-pound athlete should consume 20 to 30 ounces of water per hour. Take this very seriously. Follow a plan and do not rely on thirst. Drink water or sports drink approximately every 15 minutes. The excitement of the race atmosphere can work against you in this area. Some athletes find it effective to set a watch to beep every few minutes to remind them to fuel and hydrate.

During a half ironman, a triathlete should consume as much carbohydrate as can be digested and absorbed. For most athletes who have practiced fueling strategies during training, this amounts to about 300 calories of carbohydrate per hour for a 150-pound athlete. Each athlete is different, so experiment with this during workouts to find out how much your digestive system can handle. Find how much carbohydrate you can digest without it sitting in your stomach.

Immediately after the race, providing the body with nutrients required to refuel and to rebuild damaged tissue is critical to minimize recovery time. Make sure to consume at least 400 calories of carbohydrate and 100 calories of protein right after the race. Several excellent products designed to be used immediately post-workout are on the market.

Race Strategy

Very few athletes finish a half ironman thinking that they didn’t go hard enough early in the race. Consistent pacing is necessary to perform to your potential. Pace conservatively, especially during the first half of the bike and the first half of the run. A triathlete who rides two minutes too slowly during the first half of the bike has the opportunity to gain back most of that time. A triathlete who rides two minutes too fast will lose much more than two minutes on the run.

Race pace workouts will teach you the intensity that can be sustained on race day. Even though workouts didn’t approach race duration, a full taper plus the excitement of the race atmosphere usually allow a pace to be sustained longer. The effort that enabled effective running after the bike during workouts should do the same in the race.

Intensity should be steady throughout the race, but perceived exertion will gradually increase. The correct pace will feel easy early in the race. The same speed feels quite different at mile 10 of the bike than at mile 50. Performing to your potential is never easy, even on the best days.

Taper

A correct taper increases a triathlete’s fitness dramatically. In the last several weeks before an event it is too late to significantly increase fitness, but it is not too late to increase fatigue. After a significant taper, athletes store more fuel, deliver more oxygen to muscles, and maintain higher intensities than would have been possible before the taper. Reducing training for two to three weeks before the race will not reduce fitness. Rest!

Hard training athletes should use a gradual three-week taper. Heavy training for a half ironman leaves deep levels of fatigue. We recommend reducing training volume to about 70 percent of normal beginning three weeks before the race, to about 50 percent two weeks before the race, and to about 40 percent the week of the race. It is important to maintain some intensity. Dropping all intensity during a taper reduces red blood cell volume and decreases the efficiency of movements. Reduce workout duration, but maintain segments at race pace several times per week. A shortened version of the race-pace brick done every 72 to 96 hours will do this nicely while allowing you to rehearse your pacing strategy, also.

A half ironman can be an exhilarating experience when proper training, taper, nutrition, and pacing strategies all come together on race day. This requires planning, discipline, and hard work, but aren’t those all part of what triathlon is all about?

Ken Mierke and Joe Friel are both Ultrafit coaches. Ken’s business, Fitness Concepts, is in Annandale, VA. Joe Friel is the author of the The Triathlete’s Training Bible. Article originally published for Inside Triathlon.

18 Week Half Ironman Training Program

Utah Half Ironman - RaceTri August 25,2012

The Utah Half is just around the corner and many of you may have your schedules down pat, but here is a excellent article on training for a half Ironman. This article is republished by permission from TriNewbies.com.
Here’s the link

The following program is designed for the triathlete who has competed in several triathlons, perhaps even a season of triathlons, preferably Olympic Distance Races. It also takes into consideration he or she can run at least 7 miles or about an hour with relative ease, swim at least 5000 yards per week and ride at least 25-30 miles 3 times per week on the bike. A half Ironman is a big step-up from the standard Tri. It is definitely doable, you just have to race and train smarter.

Click here to view the schedule

The first 12 weeks of the program is considered a base building phase gradually increasing mileage and yardage. A speedwork/quality phase makes up weeks 13-16 with weeks 17 and 18 dedicated to the taper. You will also notice three recovery weeks on weeks 4, 8 and 12. These are important. Stick to them. By the end of the base building phase, some of you may start to get a little grumpy and irritable. This is due to the fact that you are pushing that “overtrained” state. Fortunately, the speedwork phase begins the following week. During this period you will be cutting back on the mileage/yardage while maintaining your overall endurance. This will also provide you with the added rest for which are looking. You will probably experience an increase in energy and your attitude will start to err towards the positive side! This is also a time when you must begin to use your head and train smart! An improper approach to speedwork can lead to injuries in all three events. We will discuss this further as we break down the individual activities.

The base building phase focuses on general aerobic training and should include the use of a heart rate monitor. If you do not own one, than I suggest you make the purchase. There are several on the market and all do a fine job. Refer to the Tri Links page for more information on heart rate monitors. And you do not have to buy the most expensive. However, you will want a model that has at least an overall time display. This will keep you from having to wear both a watch and HR monitor when you run.

I subscribe to the Maffetone method of determining your aerobic heart rate zone. This is just one method of heart rate training and certainly not the only one. You will find a basic description of this method as well as the tradtional 220-method in the article Follow Your Heart: Methods of Heart Rate Training located in the Triathlon FAQ’s section.

According to Dr. Maffetone, the following formula will give you your aerobic heart rate zone:

180 minus your age will give you your upper range in beats per minute. Then subtract 10 to find your lower range in beats per minute. If you feel this range is too high then bring everything down 5-10 beats per minute.

Ex: A 37 year old individual in descent shape-

180 – 37 = 143 This would be the upper range.

143 – 10 = 133 This is the lower range.

Therefore, the aerobic range of this particular individual is 133-143. You will find a complete breakdown of Dr. Maffetone’s method of HR training on the Tri FAQ’s page. Now according to Dr. Maffetone, this should be fine for the run and the bicycle. However, some folks have a hard time sustaining that high a heart rate on the bike. So an adjustment downward may be necessary.

The heart rate monitor should be used as a means of keeping yourself in “aerobic” check. BE STRICT with yourself and stick to your aerobic levels. Do not let anyone else influence your training. If you have been training with a partner or are currently looking for one, explain to the individual what your goals are and make sure he/she will go along. I also suggest purchasing Dr. Maffetone’s book “Training For Endurance.” I am really not trying to single out or promote his materials, I just feel he does a nice job of conveying his message while keeping things simple and easy to understand. And even if you do not fully agree with his HR training zones, the book is extremely informative and can be applied to any type of training program.

** I have included an extra workout in weeks 9-17 for each activity. You will find each highlighted in red. They include a Saturday swim, a Friday bike ride and a Sunday long walk. Each will be discussed below in their respective section. They are considered recovery workouts but will also contribute to base building within your overall program.

Swimming: The swim portion of the half Ironman is 1.5 miles and a set of swimming workouts for the entire program can be found at the bottom of this page. They were designed for training in a 25 yard pool. If you are swimming in a 25 meter pool, you can use the same workouts. For a 50 meter pool, there will be some changes. You are certainly not bound by these workouts so feel free to tweak them as you see fit. Please see the breakdown below:

25 Yard (meter) Pool – usually standard length
1 length = 25 yards (meters)
1 lap (2 lengths) = 50 yards (meters)
2 laps (4 lengths) = 100 yards (meters)
½ mile = about 800 yards = 32 lengths
1 mile = about 1700 yds (meters) = 68 lengths
1.5 miles = about 2500 yards = 100 lengths

50 Meter Pool
1 length = 50 meters
2 lengths = 100 meters
½ mile = about 800 meters = 16 lengths
1 mile = about 1500 meters = 30 lengths
1.5 miles = about 2300 meters = 46 lengths

When you read the swim workouts, you will notice that I did include yardage for stroke drills but did not specify the type of drill. If you are having difficulty with your stroke and you are without a swim coach, I suggest you purchase Terry Laughlin’s book and/or video series (800-609-SWIM) or Steve Tarpinian’s video (800-469-2538). I have not viewed either one but I understand they are full of drills and are terrific!

***The main set of each workout is based on repetitive swims with very little rest between each. Swim these relaxed. The idea is to build endurance while swimming aerobically, NOT fast. You will find your speed will begin to increase naturally. In order to stay aerobic, periodically check your heart rate throughout the set. The quickest way to do this is place your finger under your chin/neck, find your pulse and count the beats for a six second count and add a zero to the total. For example:

14 beats in 6 seconds = 140 beats per minute.

This reading is not as accurate as would be displayed on a heart rate monitor, however, I have attempted to wear a HR strap and monitor on a set of 100 freestyles (do not bother trying this, it is futile!) and found the finger-to-throat test is certainly accurate enough. Besides, it is all we swimmers have! Try to keep your heart rate between 140 – 160 beats per minute. For folks in their 40’s and up, try to keep your rate closer to 140, maybe even a bit less. For athletes in their late twenties to mid thirties, try to keep it closer to 150. And for those in their twenties and younger, 160 should be fine. The idea behind this method of training is to prepare your heart rate for the bike ride upon exiting the water during a race. The closer your heart rate is to your bike training rate, the better the outcome of your entire race. For example:

Let us say you are in your early 40’s and for eighteen weeks the bulk of your aerobic bike training was at an average heart rate of 125 bpm (beats per minute). Come race time, you exit the swim with a heart rate of 175 bpm. As you begin the bike ride, you are now a full 50 beats per minute above your bicycle training rate! Within a mile or two the ride, your heart rate will drop, but probably not the full 50 beats. More than likely, it will settle in at about 145-155 beats per minute or a 20-30 bpm recovery. Thus you will be riding the 25 mile/40k bike coarse with a heart rate some 20-30 beats higher than your training rate. And this will be the beginning of the end, for you will pay the price on the run. Now, if you were to exit the water in the same race with your heart rate closer to 140 or 150 beats per minute, and you recovered the same 20-30 bpm during the bike ride, your heart rate would settle in somewhere between 120 and 130 bpm – your normal bicycle training rate! This would only leave you better prepared for the run.

Flip turns – Do not worry about flip turns while you swim unless you feel very confident doing them. Simply take a quick breath on the wall and push off. Flip turns will cause your heart rate to rise. This in turn may negatively affect your aerobic pace. If you do swim with a masters program, you may be forced to do flip turns to keep up with the swimmers in your lane. If this be the case, move to a slower lane with less pressure from the other swimmers.

Breathing – when swimming freestyle, you should get into the habit of breathing every stroke. The more oxygen you take into the body, the lower your heart rate will remain. However, alternating your breathing or breathing every three strokes, will help you in two ways.
1. It will balance out your freestyle stroke.
2. It will get you used to looking in both directions, which may help during a race when trying to find your mark.
Also practice lifting your head and looking forward when swimming…say once or twice per lap during your main set. You may have a black line down the middle of the lane, but unless you are racing in the clear waters of the Caribbean, the open water in most tri’s will be fairly dark.

** You will notice I added a 1000 yard Saturday swim workout in weeks 9-17. The purpose of this workout is to add base yardage to your swim program and still benefit from the effects of a recovery swim. Treat this workout solely as a recovery workout after your long run on Saturday. Swim easy and relaxed, but not sloppy. There is absolute no stress involved. Kick easy, swim real easy, just relax, rest a lot and piddle in the water.

The quality workouts listed at the bottom of this page are designed to help you build speed. You will be getting a bit more rest overall from here on out, however, there will still be some longer distance workouts to maintain endurance. When you do the workouts, you want to slowly build your exerted effort and work on getting faster as the set progresses. You also want to build each workout with the last week of the quality period showing the greatest results. For example: Your quality set is 5 x 100’s all out on the 6 minutes. First, you want to try to build your effort with each lap of the100 so you are finishing faster than you started. In a 25 yard pool, always swim the first 25 yards building up your effort so when you come off the first wall, you can begin to really push it.You will also want to attempt to descend each 100 so the each 100 gets faster. And your overall set should be faster the last week of the quality phase as opposed to the first. You do not want to start out at a full sprint. You will risk injury, perhaps in your shoulders, and you will be driving your heart rate up too fast, too soon. I suggest you swim your quality workouts in a 25 yard pool. The point is simply to build speed. If you attempt to do quality work in a 50 meter pool, lake or ocean, you will tire out much sooner due to fewer walls which will actually hurt your speedwork. Plus you will not be swimming this hard in a race, so there is no point in trying to simulate such conditions. And again, do not worry about flip turns. In a set like this where you are pushing your heart rate to maximum levels, flip turns will not hurt you. But if you do not know how to do one…it is fine. Taking a quick breath on each wall with a good push-off will actually help you remain in “sprint-mode” for the entire swim.

Cycling: Again, your bike rides should be aerobic, concentrating on staying within your heart rate zone. Remember, for some, the running heart rate zone may be higher than that of cycling, so you will need to experiment to find out what works best for you. Attempting to cycle within your running HR zone may do more harm to your aerobic system than not. To experiment, subtract 5 to 10 beats from your running zone and determine how it feels during the ride. For example:

If you are 40 years of age, and in pretty good shape, your aerobic heart rate zone based on the Maffetone method, should be 130-140. If you were to subtract 10 beats for your cycle training, your zone would be 120-130. And this is where you should experiment.

Obviously, the flatter the terrain on which you ride, the easier it will be to monitor your heart. If you live in a hilly or mountainous area, your rate will definitely rise when cycling uphill. If this be the case, shift to higher gears (so you are spinning) and try to keep your ride smooth. Avoid pumping the pedals if possible. The harder you pump, the higher your heart rate will rise. This will not always be as easy as said but you should at least attempt to keep your heart rate as low as possible during the uphills. Also, try to remain in the saddle while riding uphill and only climb out as a last resort.

Cycling workouts during base building phase:
Monday – your ride should be treated as somewhat of a recovery/aerobic ride after your long Sunday ride. Warm up for 15 minutes keeping your heart rate (HR) below your training zone. For the bulk of you ridekeep your HR at the lower end of your training zone. Finally, leave yourself enough time for a goodcool-down. On all cool downs, wait until your HR drops as close to or below 100 bpm before stopping.
Wednesday – your ride will be about the same as Monday. However, during the bulk of your ride, train with your heart rate at the mid to high end of your zone but do not go higher…stay within it. Just remember to leave yourself enoughtime for a cool-down.
Friday – when you begin your Friday rides on the 9th week, treat each one as an easy, easy spinning day. It will be a nice warm-up for your Saturday long run. Keep your heart rate well below the zone throughout the entire ride.
Sunday – finally, your Sunday ride will be the most important. This is where you will practice your eating and drinking. Begin the ride with a 20 minute warm-up. For the bulk of the ride keep your HR at the low end of the zone for as long as possible. As you increase your distance, you will begin to see your endurance fall off as your heart rate will climb just a bit toward the end of the ride. In fact you will probably be riding slower than when you began. Do not worry, just keep your HR in the zone. Eventually, you will see your endurance increase. Finally, leave yourself enough time for a cool down.

Aero position: Because you will be cycling for about 2.5-3 hours during your race, acclimation to the aero position is necessary, especially on a flatter race coarse. The flatter the coarse, the less the need to get out of the saddle to ride i.e. Hill work. Your Sunday long ride will certainly be a good time to practice. Once you have decided on a race, try to find out as much info as possible about the bike coarse. Is it hilly? What are the winds like…etc? Then try to simulate these conditions within your own training rides. For example, if the coarse is hilly, incorporate some hill work or hill repeats into your biking regimen. If you know the coarse is famous for its winds, say along a coastline, try to ride on days you know the wind has picked up. Typically, the wind will pick up in the afternoons so plan a couple of rides after work. Once daylight savings time begins, you will have time in the late afternoons to get in a good ride. Spending alot of time in the aero position can cause some lower back pain, at least in the begining. If you are experiencing lower back pain after your ride, a good lower back stretch is a must as you increase the distances in your cycling. One good strectch (see figure to the right) is to lay on your back and pull your knees to your chest. Wrap your arms around the outside of you legs and gently squeeze the arms pulling the knees closer to the chest. You should feel this in your lower back. Remember, ease into the stretch by pulling gently. You may also lift one leg at a time to your chest while leaving the other extended with a slight bend. ***NOTE***

When incorporating hill work into your bike rides or if you are faced with strong headwinds throughout your ride, staying aerobic should still be your goal. With the hills, this will be tougher to do. Unlike riding into head winds, gravity plays a huge roll on hill work, and your heart rate can soar. So do the best that you can. As you travel uphill, stay in the saddle, switch to higher gears and try to maintain an easy spin as opposed to pounding the pedals. Obviously, if you live in the west where “hills” are much steeper and longer, some of this is easier said than done, but try to stay as close to your zone as possible. For some of you, headwinds will always be part of your training. If so, again, shift to higher gears, and find a comfortable pace. As I stated earlier, gravity will not play the same role here, but psychologically, head winds can be quite defeating. Find a nice gear and spin rather than grind the pedals. Do not worry about speed.

Bike trainers: During the winter months, some of you will be forced to ride indoors on a trainer. And this can be extremely boring!…even with the most user friendly trainers such as a Computrainer. However, riding on a trainer does provide one excellent benefit – Mental Toughness. And this will only help. Once you begin riding outdoors, the bike trainer can still play a significant role in your cycling program especially during your quality workouts.

Quality workouts can be dangerous on the highways unless you can find a road that is rarely traveled upon. And even this can be dangerous simply because sprint cycling on the highways requires so much thought and concentration, safe biking habits are usually sacrificed. The trainer will offer you the ability to focus solely on your speedwork without any worry of highway traffic.

Quality Work: Like swimming, you will want to build within your quality set, as well as throughout the weeks of the quality phase. For example:

If your quality workout consists of 6 x 5 and 2’s…Five minutes hard, two minutes easy/recover, you should take the first 5/2 of the first day building your effort. On the first 5/2, gradually build your effort throughout the first five minutes. Do not just start out hammering. On the second 5/2, you can build your effort a little quicker so by numbers 3-6 you are really going after it. And each particular quality day, follow this same pattern. By the last week of the quality phase, your output or results should still exceed those recorded on that first session.

** You will notice I added a 20 mile bike ride on Friday’s in weeks 9-17. The purpose of this addition is to add base mileage to your cycling program and still benefit from the effects of spinning. The ride can be used as a recovery ride as well as a prep ride for your Saturday long run. However, to benefit from this ride you must spin in a high gear the entire ride, keeping your heart rate very low. If you are riding on hills, than this will be tougher but try to stick to your plan. If you are riding in headwinds, just slow your cadence until your heart rate drops to the desired mark. For more information on the benefits of spinning and how it can positively affect your running than click here!

Running: The key to a successful endurance running program is training smart. And the best way to accomplish this is through aerobic training with a heart rate monitor. By now you should have determined your running heart rate zone based on the information at the top of the page. However, if you would like to explore other methods of heart rate training feel free to check out the article on Methods of Heart Rate Training. As previously mentioned, I tend to adhere to the methods of Dr. Phil Maffetone. And according to Dr. Maffetone, a successful running program should include a solid warm-up and cool down. When you head out on your run, spend the first 12-15 minutes warming up slowly bringing your HR up to your aerobic zone. After you have completed the bulk of your run spend the last 12-15 minutes bringing your heart back below your training zone. For example:

An individual with an aerobic HR zone of 130-140 bpm heads out on a 45 minute run. The first 15 minutes is spent slowly bringing the heart rate up to 130 bpm. After the warm-up, the individual then runs for 15 minutes keeping his/her heart rate between 130-140 bum. Finally, the last 15 minutes will be spent running below 130 bpm and should be maintained until the run is completed.

The running distances in the program are listed in minutes. However, if you feel comfortable running in miles than that is fine. Just allow yourself a sufficient warm-up and cool down period. The advantage of running by minutes is it allows you to accurately assess your training improvement.

Running hints: If you can, run on a grass path, or gravel path. The softer the ground, the better the shock absorption for your legs. Concrete is the worst, asphalt is next, tar is very soft (running track) with any type of dirt trail being the best. Actually, running on a golf coarse is ideal! Unfortunately, concrete sidewalks surround the entire island on which I live, so remember, you get what you get. Whatever the surface, stay aerobic and you
should be fine.

***For many of you, you will be testing new grounds regarding running distances and injury prevention is of the upmost importance. If you are having difficulty on your long run, then incorporate some walking into the run. Long time marathoner, author and running coach, Jeff Galloway incorporates walking into his training programs for longer distance running. After reaching a particular distance in your long run, say 9 miles or so, then begin a walk/run segment to finish your run. For example:

If your long run is 90 minutes or around 6-8 miles, and you are having problems getting over that 60 minute barrier, than run/walk for the remaining 30 minutes…perhaps 5 minutes run, 2 minutes walk. You will find that your overall time will not be that much slower and most importantly, you will feel much better after the run. At least your legs will thank you! If you do decide to run/walk on your long run, do not run until you become fatigued and then decide to walk. Many folks will say to themselves “I’m not stopping, I feel fine” subscribing to the no pain, no gain philosophy. However, you may find you will not recover fast enough for the next run segment. If you have set a 5 minute limit to your run, then stop at 5 minutes! If you want to build your mileage as pain free as possible then stick to your limits regardless of how good you may feel.

**You will notice walking was added to the program in weeks 9-16. I am a huge believer in walking. You can use it as a means of recovery after your long ride as well as a substitute for an easy run day. I usually walk at least once during the week, for about 75 minutes and at a rather fast pace with a long stride. I like to think of it as an extra day of running without the pounding. I personally do not do a lot of arm pumping when I walk, however feel free. It won’t hurt you.

Weights: Finally, I suggest you lift weights at least two days per week and no more than three. Do some type of circuit training and 2 sets of 15 reps per exercise. Keep the weights light. You do not want to build bulk. We just want to build some strength for endurance. And, make sure you do not rush through each set of 15. Just because the weights are light, does not mean you hurry through the set. Take your time with each rep concentrating on form rather than speed. You may feel sluggish the first couple of weeks but it will get better. A basic circuit consists of Lat Pull Downs, Bench Press, Leg Lifts, Leg Curls, Squats (or lunges), Tricep Pull Down, Bicep Curls, Calf Raises and sit-ups or crunches. Feel free to add or leave out what you see fit.

Speed or Quality Workouts

Swim Quality Workouts

Warm – up
»
 500 sw, 200 k, 100 sw
6 x 50’s build 15 sec. rest bet. ea. …………1100 yds
»
 5 x 100’s hypoxic-breath every 3 strokes……………………………………………………..500yds
»
 5 x 100 fast on 7 min.sw with an
easy 50 while resting………………………………..500yds
»
 Easy 200 sw dn …………………………………….200 yds
Total ……………………………………………………2300 yds

 

Cycling Quality Workout

 

» Warm-up:10 miles easy or 30 minutes.
Keep youe HR below your training zone.
» 6 x 3/2’s – 3 minutes hard/2 minutes easy
10 mile (30 minute) cool-down
» During the hard portion of the ride, build within the ride. Keep your HR 5-10 beats above your HR zone.
Note:During the four weeks add a minute to the
hard ride so by week four you are cycling
6 min hard/2 min easy

 

Running Quality Workout

 

On a Track:
»Warm-up 1.5 miles (6 laps) easy
»5 minute stretch routine
»1 x 880 (2 laps) 5 bpm above top end of HR zone w/ an easy 440 between (1 lap) then rest 1 minute. Do this set 3 times
Easy 1.5 cool down – run/walk
Note: During the four weeks add an 880 eachweek so by week four you are running 6 x 880’s.

**Note** regarding the Quality Running Workout: if you are unable to make it to a track, then you can incorporate this workout into your regular daily run. Just take your average 1 mile split time and half it. This will be the length of time you will run hard. Then divide the average by four and this will be your recovery run. Then walk for 1 minute.
For example:
Your average 1 mile run is 8:00. You will run hard for 4 minutes, recovery for 2 minutes and walk 1 minute. The warm-up and cool down will remain as above.For a 7:00 minute/mile average, your hard run will be 3.5 minutes (3:30), your recovery 1.75 (1:45) minutes and your walk 1 minute and so on.

Swim Workouts

(1)
Warm-up # 1 …………………….300 yds
5 x 100’s sw-15″ rest bet. …500 yds
200 swim down real easy ….200 yds
Total ……………………………..1000 yds
(2)
Warm-up # 1 ……………………300 yds
10 x 50s sw – 10″ bet. ea……500 yds
200 swim down real easy …200 yds
Total …………………………….1000 yds
(3)
Warm-up # 1 ……………………300 yds
500 swim …………………………..500 yds
200 swim down real easy ….200 yds
Total ……………………………..1000 yds
(4)
Warm-up # 1 …………………….300 yds
8 x 100’s sw-15″ rest bet. ….800 yds
150 swim down real easy ….150 yds
Total …………………………….1250 yds
(5)
Warm-up # 1 ……………………300 yds
16 x 50s sw -10″ bet. ea. …..800 yds
150 swim down real easy ….150 yds
Total ……………………………..1250 yds
(6)
Warm-up # 1 …………………….300 yds
800 swim …………………………..800 yds
150 swim down real easy …150 yds
Total …………………………….1250 yds
(7)
Warm-up # 2 ……………………500 yds
4 x 200’s sw-20″ rest bet. …..800 yds
200 swim down real easy …..200 yds
Total ………………………………1500 yds
(8)
Warm-up # 2 ……………………500 yds
16 x 50s sw – 10″ res bet. ea.800 yds
200 swim down real easy ….200 yds
Total ……………………………..1500 yds
(9)
Warm-up # 2 ……………………..500 yds
800 swim …………………………800 yds
200 swim down real easy ….200 yds
Total ……………………………..1500 yds
(10)
Warm-up # 2…………………….500 yds
5 x 100’s sw -15″   bet. ea. ..500 yds
10 x 50’s k-15″ rest bet. ea. .500 yds
250 swim down real easy ….250 yds
Total ……………………………..1750 yds
(11)
Warm-up # 2 …………………….500 yds
1 x 100 sw-15″ rest bet. ea.
2 x 50’s k-10″ rest bet. ea.
do this set 5 times ………….1000 yds
250 swim down real easy ….250 yds
Total………………………………1750 yds
(12)
Warm-up # 1 …………………….300 yds
500 sw; 400 pull;
300 kick; 200 sw; 100 pull ..1500 yds
200 swim down real easy ….200 yds
Total………………………………2000 yds
(13)
Warm-up # 2 …………………….500 yds
1000 swim ……………………….1000 yds
500 Drill …………………………….500 yds
250 swim down real easy ….250 yds
Total ……………………………..2000 yds
(14)
Warm-up # 3 …………………….800 yds
Stroke Drill ……………………….500 yds
10 x 100’s sw-15″ rbet. ea. .1000 yds
200 swim down real easy …..200 yds
Total ……………………………..2500 yds
(15)
Warm-up # 3 ……………………..800 yds
Stroke Drills……………………… 500 yds
5 x 200 sw-20″ rest bet. ea. 1000 yds
200 swim down real easy …..200 yds
Total ………………………………2500 yds
Warm-ups
Warm-up # 1
200 sw, 50 k, 50 sw ……………300 yds
Warm-up # 2
300 sw, 100 k, 100sw …………500 yds
Warm-up # 3
500 sw, 200k, 100 sw …………800 yds

Here’s the full 18 Week Schedule

Date

 Swim  Bike  Run
 WK-1

 

 

 

Mon

 (#1) 1000 yds. a.m.

20 miles. p.m.

 

Tues

(#2) 1000 yds. a.m

 

40 min p.m.

Wed

 

20 miles. p.m.

 

Thur

 (#3) 1000 yds. a.m

 

30 min p.m.

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

50 min a.m.

Sun

 

25 miles. a.m.

 

 WK-2

 

 

 

Mon

 (#1) 1000 yds. a.m

20 miles. p.m.

 

Tue

 (#4) 1250 yds. a.m

 

45 min p.m.

Wed

 

25 miles. p.m.

 

Thur

(#2) 1000 yds. a.m

 

35 min p.m.

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

55 min a.m.

Sun

 

30 miles a.m.

 

 WK-3

 

 

 

Mon

 (#3) 1000 yds. a.m

20 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#5) 1250 yds. a.m

 

45 min p.m

Wed

 

25 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#6) 1250 yds. a.m

 

40 min p.m

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

60 min a.m

Sun

 

35 miles a.m.

 

 WK-4  Recovery  Recovery  Recovery

Mon

(#1) 1000 yds. a.m

20 miles p.m.

 

Tue

(#2) 1000 yds. a.m

 

40 min p.m

Wed

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Thur

(#3) 1000 yds. a.m

 

30 min p.m

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

50 min a.m

Sun

 

30 miles a.m.

 

 WK-5

 

 

 

Mon

 (#1) 1000 yds. a.m

20 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#7) 1500 yds. a.m

 

45 min p.m

Wed

 

25 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#4) 1250 yds. a.m

 

40 min p.m

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

60 min a.m

Sun

 

40 miles a.m.

 

WK-6

 

 

 

Mon

 (#5) 1250 yds. a.m

25 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#8) 1500 yds. a.m

 

50 min p.m

Wed

 

25 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#9) 1500 yds. a.m

 

40 min p.m

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

70 min a.m

Sun

 

45 miles a.m.

 

 WK-7

 

 

 

Mon

 (#6) 1250 yds. a.m

25 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#10) 1750 yds. a.m

 

60 min p.m

Wed

 

30 miles p.m.

 

Thur

(#7) 1500 yds. a.m

 

45 min p.m

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

80 min a.m

Sun

 

45 miles a.m.

 

 WK-8  Recovery  Recovery  Recovery

Mon

 (#2) 1000 yds. a.m

20 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#4) 1250 yds. a.m

 

50 min p.m

Wed

 

25 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#5) 1250 yds. a.m

 

35 min p.m

Fri

 

 

 

Sat

 

 

70 min a.m

Sun

 

35 miles a.m.

 

 WK-9

 

 

 

Mon

 (#6) 1250 yds. a.m

25 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#12) 2000 yds. a.m

 

60 min p.m

Wed

 

30 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#8) 1500 yds. a.m

 

50 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

80 min p.m

Sun

 

50 miles a.m.

75 min walk p.m

 WK-10

 

 

 

Mon

 (#9) 1500 yds. a.m

25 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#14) 2250 yds. a.m

 

60 min p.m

Wed

 

35 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#11) 1750 yds. a.m

 

50 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

90 min a.m

Sun

 

55 miles a.m.

75 min walk p.m

 WK-11

 

 

 

Mon

 (#7) 1500 yds. a.m

25 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#14) 2500 yds. a.m

 

60 min p.m

Wed

 

40 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#10) 1750 yds. a.m

 

50 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

100 min a.m

Sun

 

60 miles a.m.

75 min walk p.m

 WK-12  Recovery  Recovery  Recovery

Mon

 (#3) 1000 yds. a.m

20 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#13) 2000 yds. a.m

 

50 min p.m

Wed

 

30 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#4) 1250 yds. a.m

 

40 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

90 min a.m

Sun

 

50 miles a.m.

60 min walk p.m

Speedwork/Quality Phase

WK-13

Swim Bike

Run

Mon

 (#8) 1500 yds. a.m

30 miles p.m.


Tue

 (#15) 2500 yds. a.m

 

 Quality Day

Wed

 

 Quality Day

 

Thur

 Quality Day a.m.

 

60 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds. p.m

 

90 min a.m

Sun

 

50 miles a.m.

60 min. walk p.m

 WK-14

 

 

 

Mon

 (#9) 1500 yds. a.m

30 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#14) 2500 yds. a.m

 

 Quality Day

Wed

 

 Quality Day

 

Thur

 Quality Day a.m.

 

60 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

90 min a.m

Sun

 

50 miles a.m.

60 min. walk p.m

 WK-15

 

 

 

Mon

 (#7) 1500 yds. a.m

30 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#15) 2500 yds. a.m

 

 Quality Day

Wed

 

 Quality Day

 

Thur

 Quality Day a.m.

 

60 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

90 min a.m

Sun

 

50 miles a.m.

60 min. walk p.m

 WK-16

 

 

 

Mon

 (#8) 1500 yds. a.m

30 miles p.m.

 

Tue

 (#14) 2500 yds. a.m

 

 Quality Day

Wed

 

 Quality Day

 

Thur

 Quality Day a.m.

 

60 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

90 min a.m

Sun

 

50 miles a.m.

60 min. walk p.m

 WK-17

 Begin Taper  Begin Taper

 Begin Taper

Mon

 

 

 

Tue

 (#15) 2500 yds a.m.

 

60 min p.m

Wed

 

30 miles p.m.

 

Thur

 (#9) 1500 yds a.m.

 

40 min p.m

Fri

 

20 miles p.m.

 

Sat

 (choice) 1000 yds.

 

75 min p.m

Sun

 

50 miles a.m.

 

 WK-18

 

 

 

Mon

(#7) 1500 yds a.m.


40 min p.m

Tue

 

40 miles p.m.

 

Wed

 (choice) 1000 yds

20 miles p.m.

30 min p.m

Thur

(Travel Day)

(Travel Day)

(Travel Day)

Fri

15 min. easy

15 min. spin

30 min walk

Sat

 Race Day  Race Day

 Race Day

Sun